WOVEN DESTINY. INSTALLATION

2020
Recycle t-shirt yarn
9 ft x 4 ft
Installation extends 20 ft wide

The spider as a symbol of weaving and cosmogonic creation has been in the

repertoire of almost every culture’s folk tales, oral and written history. From the 

Graeco-Latin myths to Guatemalan stories, Arachne is symbolized in the act of
weaving. The act of weaving requires the maker to remain continuously attentive
to their work just like the spider. The creature is endowed with the ability to
create non-stop, spin, weave, knot and form a web of patience. The spider is
more than a symbol of weaving, it is also a symbol of persistence. The same type
of tenacity details the story of the women of the suffrage movement. They
became adept in the act of weaving beliefs of justice for all, the struggle for the
vote, and fighting for democracy and equal rights.
 
Molina’s new series undoubtedly uses the motif of Arachne as a representation
of the women’s suffrage movement. A connection that is also rooted on native
cultures who used weaving such as the Navajo, their dream catcher and a mix of
New England folk rag rug weaving. Just like the rug hooking of the 1900s that
used whatever materials were available, these pieces are assembled from
repurposed t-shirt yarn. The yarn is recycled from the garment industry, a by-
product of the industrialization of textiles.
 
With precision, skill and creativity, Molina brings this art to contemporary
standards. This installation is conceived from two disparate ideologies of “in
group our strength lies” and “self-reliance is transformative”.  Following Ralph
Waldo Emerson’s views on 
individualism as a profound and unshakeable trust in one’s own intuitions. Each
individual orb references the maker’s alter egos and are woven from personal
items; each piece carries a story and a DNA. All the orbs together form a new-
found power of fresh strength, a newly empowered whole that brings on social
change and individual enlightenment.
This installation based on women of the suffrage movement weaves a web of
stories of self and community reliance. The girls with their hands on their hips,
protesting and being non-conformist suggest the enlightened leaders of the
suffrage movement.  A mob of women and girls embracing the challenge, with a
message on hand and ready to fight. Social justice is proclaimed by this group of
young women just like the suffragists100 years ago.

© 2014. All rights reserved to the artist.

  • Facebook Classic
  • Instagram App Icon
  • YouTube Classic